Namibia

Our research in Namibia seeks to learn from people who rely on the ocean, in order to understand the pressing challenges facing marine ecosystems and ensure that the blue economy supports sustainable ‘blue’ communities.

White pelican by the pier in Walvis Bay, Namibia. Photo: Laura Meriläinen

The coast of Namibia is part of an exceptionally rich marine ecosystem, supporting one for the most productive fisheries areas in the Atlantic. This ecosystem supports the economically important commercial and recreational fishing sectors, which contribute approximately 3.5% of Namibian GDP. Shore-based recreational fishing is the lifeblood of the coastal communities of central Namibia, providing a critical source of tourism, income and food.

Namibia is developing a policy and action plan for the development of the country’s sustainable blue economy. Implementation of this plan requires a deep understanding of the ecosystem, and ecosystem services on which coastal communities are reliant, and communities’ needs and benefits related to the ocean.

Our research seeks to learn from people who rely on the ocean, in order to understand the pressing challenges facing marine ecosystems and ensure that the blue economy supports sustainable ‘blue’ communities. We aim to advance understanding of the value of marine ecosystem services within Namibian waters, which sustain key sectors such as the recreational line fishery.

In parallel, we will support the long-term sustainability of the recreational and subsistence fishing sectors by working with the angling community and management authorities to develop, and implement, environmentally sustainable practices, behaviours, and monitoring systems.

In Namibia the blue economy concept is anchored in SDG 14: Life below water
Namibia has one of the most productive fishing industries in Africa due to the presence of the Benguela current

Latest news & blogs from Namibia

Customary Laws of the Coast and Sea Research Group – The Story So Far (Part One)

The Customary Laws of the Coast and Sea Research Group formed in 2020 as a means to bring together One Ocean Hub researchers interested in customary laws within an ocean governance context.

Focus on: Namibia

In this series we introduce some of the recent developments made in different countries. This month we bring you news from Namibia.

Meet our researcher in Namibia – interview with Sirkka Tshiningayamwe

In this Q&A series we get to know a different One Ocean Hub researcher every month.